Archive for December, 2013

Travel for business is rarely pleasurable

Posted by 20 December, 2013 (0) Comment

Recently a intern from the United States got appendicitis while he was seconded to us. This article highlights the inconvenience this causes to an individual, the business, and everyone.

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Knowledge is not power every time

 

Stephen had majored in bio mechanics. It didn’t stop him coming a cropper when his body decided to give out whilst in the UK. He had never had issues with his stomach before, and who knows what actually caused his appendix to grumble. No one was more shocked than he, when he was told he needed a surgical intervention. To say I was shocked was an understatement. The people who look after him called me to say that he had been hospitalised and that he wouldn’t be able to work for 48 hours.

Little did we know, this was just the start of his problems. The first thing to consider when an employee falls ill is their welfare. Fortunately, we have the NHS, and I knew Stephen would be well looked after. However, after he had been stabilised the boredom set in, and his real nightmare began.

Completing projects benefits everyone

 

Stephen wasn’t exactly overjoyed when his mother arrived. Who can blame her, she was really worried about her still teenage son. However, Stephen was more concerned about his father and brothers, who would, at first, starve for a few days. His other concern was that they would give him a lot of grief for removing their carer for a few days. When it became evident that doctors were too quick to discharge Stephen, he headed back to A&E with an issue that could not have been related to his missing appendix. The doctors were more concerned this time, as surely, they hadn’t removed his appendix for nothing.

It was at this time that Stephen became extremely apologetic and was more than a bit miffed. He had intended to show that he was not a one trick pony, by completing a project that we had agreed upon before he arrived in the UK. It was evident that he would be able to start the project, but certainly not complete it. So after the welfare of a sick employee is resolved, there is still the lost time and productivity to think about.

Why do clients trust us with their travelers?

 

Usually I’m dealing with clients whose staff have been taken out of action whilst they are abroad. The things that have happened recently include someone in the USA cutting their hand on a tin of beans (I kid you not!) and had been relieved of $4,000 by US hospitals. More pressing was the cost of the employee who had to be sent to replace them. The presentation they could not complete still had to be delivered on time. Don’t even get me started on the issues that clients had with a volcanic ash a few years ago. That was the week when everyone who thought that it would never happen to them, realised that it had. The one issue a client raised with me that I thought would never happen, is probably the most tragic I have ever been involved with.

Luckily, I did not have to deal with the issue on the day it arose. Before I ran my own business I worked for brokers who spent a lot of time working with charities. Imagine my horror to hear on the news one day that a young person had been attacked by a polar bear whilst on a field trip in an inhospitable region. Your thoughts turn to the family of the injured at times like that.

There was a fatality in this case, yet I was also certain that the emergency assistance that I had arranged for this particular charity had the resources, including helicopters, to make sure that everyone on the ground was helped as soon as possible, and that the students were spirited away from the area as soon as was practical. I also know that a counselling service was available for those traumatised by the issue. It’s not often someone in my industry can take pride when something goes wrong. You really, sincerely, hope it never does. Yet knowing what you have done professionally has helped people personally is what we strive for.

Wrap Up: Some of my clients go as far as covering the holiday travel arrangements of their staff, as they don’t want them to be left stranded in a foreign clime because their personal travel arrangements fell apart. If you run a tight ship then all of your staff are absolutely necessary, you don’t want to be without them for a few days just because a travel insurance company decides to wriggle out of their promise to get all travellers home when they need to be back.

Top Tip: Planning for the worst might seem pessimistic, but it pays to be prepared. Make sure you are covered for every eventuality – if you can imagine it it can happen.

Categories : Accountants Insurance,After The Event,All Risks Insurance,Building Contractor,Business Insurance,Company Insurance,Contractors Insurance,Customer Service,Design Insurance,Domian name protection,General Requirements,Health & Safety,Intellectual Property Insurance,Legal expenses insurance,Liability Insurance,Litigation expenses insurance,Patent Insurance,Personal Insurance,Solicitors indemnity,Solicitors insurance,Trade,Trade Secret Protection,Trademark Insurance,Uncategorized Tags : , , , , , , , , ,

Insurance claims departments grill their clients

Posted by 13 December, 2013 (0) Comment

Not all insurance companies treat claimants the same. This article is about what happens when an insurance company settles a claim for a break-in, the methods they use to reduce claims, and the daft things they do afterwards.

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“Someone’s breaking in across the road”

 

A man is up later than he should be. He hears a loud bang, and peers out his front room window. He sees that there are some shadowy figures and torchlight inside the office premises across the road.  Stopping himself from rushing across the road, he calls the police instead. He took the sensible option. By the time he finishes the call to the police the burglers are gone. It’s a classic commercial theft. Kick the doors in and take whatever isn’t nailed down and can be sold for cash.

The police contact the owners and the premises are secured, which is difficult to do when a UPVC door has been ripped from it’s hinges! Yet it’s a temporary measure, a more permanent fix can be worked out later. Computers, monitors and petty cash have been taken.

Insurers step up… then down again

 

The client contacts us in the morning and we make the report to their insurer, who won’t do anything until the crime reference number is allocated by the police. Armed with this, we make a detailed report explaining what items have been stolen and what damage has been caused. The people handling the claim seem amiable. A few hours later we receive the email acknowledgement, yet they start as they mean to go on requesting why my client kept so much petty cash. The irony.

It’s this sort of nit picking that really annoys people. They didn’t ask how much petty cash they had before the break in. Indeed, they even make a generous allowance for it as a policy benefit. Yet they use it as a tactic to delay making a payment. It wasn’t the only tactic, they argued about the broken door too.

Settlement achieved

 

It took a few days to resolve, yet the experience left a sour taste with the client.  “How will they behave if we have a major loss?” I reassured them that this company was better in the big losses, which is why we had chosen them. It’s just that you need to have experience in order to push the small ones through, because this company uses smaller claims to train their staff. They don’t tell you that in their literature before you buy from them – we have the inside track.

Once the client has his full payment he asks me to look for alternative insurance providers, which is understandable! Who wants to be contractually tied to someone that makes it difficult together what the contract is supposed to provide? Especially when it’s before a problem with the terms and conditions. A “can-do” attitude means a lot to those who want their businesses to run smoothly. They avoid suppliers that make their life difficult after advertising that they would make it easy. Insurers could take note, but they won’t. This insurer said they would be happy to lose this client because it was “petty cash” that made them attractive to thieves. Poppycock.

Wrap Up: There are hundreds of reasons why insurers are slow to pay out, some are procedural, others personality based. As Forrest Gump said, claims departments are like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re going to get……unless you have opened them before.

Top Tip: Make sure your adviser has handled similar outcomes to those that you’re worried about if you really want the reassurance that insurance allied to service can provide.

 

 

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